Systematic Studio Performance

13 August 2010, 9am–12pm
Performance | London

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Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch

About

For the duration of Systematic, a group of artists who work with systems has been using the building at 176 Prince of Wales Road as a studio to develop a live performance event including Paul B Davis, Benedict Drew, Tom Richards and Richard Sides.

Paul B. Davis presents "Some difficulties I have in evaluating system based art, both my own and others'": A talk and intervention into Haroon Mirza's Paradise Loft

"System" is a low-content phrase in art practice - what isn't one? Paul B. Davis examines the tension between the anatomy of a system and its surface: how the thing might "work" internally, how knowledge of its inside workings can affect its evaluation (historically done on the outside), and whether outside is where evaluation should even take place. For Davis these questions are especially relevant with computer-based systems because the potential of perfect emulation is a defining characteristic of any computer. Tonight, he will discuss this in greater depth and explore related issues by manipulating Mirza's installation using a system of his own design.

Benedict Drew presents "The Wah-Wah Shoe (an interpretation aid for the Systematic exhibition)"

Benedict Drew works across a variety of media including video, performance and music. THE WAH-WAH SHOE (AN INTERPRETATION AID FOR THE SYSTEMATIC EXHIBITION) combines sound, video and performance to disrupt the delivery of the interpretative text that accompanies the exhibition. Drew's work aims to create or locate systems, often using the mechanics of film, video and music production in order to destabilize and thereby reveal those systems at work.

Tom Richards presents: "Down With Love/ Strangers In The Night"

Tom Richards works with sound, film and electronics. In this latest incarnation of his adapted DJ performance he pits two iconic records against one another to cacophonic effect, until they eventually reach musical compatibility as both styli crash into the labels. As the performance develops, Richards will also use his own specially cut records and handmade electronic devices.

Richard Sides presents: "Something to do with your time"

Relating to mathematics, spectralism, computer synthesis, structuralist film and Chuck Norris, Something to do with your time is an experimental project for the integration of various forms and processes with an aim to explore systematic models.

In two parts, the performance/composition uses analysis techniques, autonomous objects, a saxophonist, film and sound to build a system of various audio/visual relationships. The movements of a projected film by Angharad Williams are used to drive a computer system that produces new sounds and images in response, from which modulations, amongst others, are created across the space.

Plus Sean Dack on the DECKS!

Plus BEERS!

Gallery

Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch
Systematic Studio Performance, 2010 at Zabludowicz Collection, London Photo: Tim Bowditch