360: Virtual Reality Room

Share:
Rachel Maclean, Zabludowicz Collection, London. I’m Terribly Sorry, 2018. Virtual reality installation. Produced in collaboration with Werkflow. Commissioned in partnership with Arsenal Contemporary. Courtesy the artist and Zabludowicz Collection.
Rachel Maclean, Zabludowicz Collection, London. I’m Terribly Sorry, 2018. Virtual reality installation. Produced in collaboration with Werkflow. Commissioned in partnership with Arsenal Contemporary. Courtesy the artist and Zabludowicz Collection.

About

360 is the first dedicated virtual reality viewing room in an arts space in the UK. It presents a series of solo projects that are open and free to the public to experience.

Virtual reality technology offers artists new ways of creating sensory environments and narratives. It allows images to become sculptural, amplifies our attention, and transports us to a different kind of embodiment and interaction.

360 presents ambitious works produced by pioneering artists in the medium, mapping the current terrain of virtual reality (VR) and shaping the conversation around its future.

VR works from the Zabludowicz Collection are available to view by appointment, book now.

Filip Kostic
Executable Experience
, 2017
From an office desktop to a fantastical landscape with flying dragons, to a floating digital rendering of a Hollywood actor, Kostic’s multi-layered VR experience probes the philosophical possibilities of the real and the imaginary and how we create meaning.

Rachel Maclean
I’m Terribly Sorry
, 2018
The artist’s first VR work made in collaboration with Werkflow and commissioned by the Zabludowicz Collection for Maclean’s 2018 solo show. The work is an interactive experience set in a dystopian urban British landscape of manic tourist merchandise, it reflects on societal unease and misunderstanding in a culture of voracious documentation, self-performance and voyeurism.

                The Swan Collective
                NowForeVR, 2016
                In NowForeVR (360° immersive video, 2016) the viewer finds themselves standing in a fractured architecture. The structures’ distorted and stretched surfaces comprise of seemingly barren urban landscape paintings by the collective. Repeated on the walls, floor and roof, these paintings give an illusion of perspective which confuse and intrigue as windows become walls and floors become ceilings, only the CGI water pools help the viewer locate themselves as upright.

                  Exhibiting Artists